ancientart:

Native American petroglyphs at Hot Springs County, Wyoming, USA.
Archaeologists attribute many of these petroglyphs to the ancestors of Shoshone people, whom live in Wyoming today.
Photos courtesy & taken by Wyoming_Jackrabbit. ancientart:

Native American petroglyphs at Hot Springs County, Wyoming, USA.
Archaeologists attribute many of these petroglyphs to the ancestors of Shoshone people, whom live in Wyoming today.
Photos courtesy & taken by Wyoming_Jackrabbit. ancientart:

Native American petroglyphs at Hot Springs County, Wyoming, USA.
Archaeologists attribute many of these petroglyphs to the ancestors of Shoshone people, whom live in Wyoming today.
Photos courtesy & taken by Wyoming_Jackrabbit. ancientart:

Native American petroglyphs at Hot Springs County, Wyoming, USA.
Archaeologists attribute many of these petroglyphs to the ancestors of Shoshone people, whom live in Wyoming today.
Photos courtesy & taken by Wyoming_Jackrabbit. ancientart:

Native American petroglyphs at Hot Springs County, Wyoming, USA.
Archaeologists attribute many of these petroglyphs to the ancestors of Shoshone people, whom live in Wyoming today.
Photos courtesy & taken by Wyoming_Jackrabbit.

ancientart:

Native American petroglyphs at Hot Springs County, Wyoming, USA.

Archaeologists attribute many of these petroglyphs to the ancestors of Shoshone people, whom live in Wyoming today.

Photos courtesy & taken by Wyoming_Jackrabbit.

fuckyeahdavidhockney:

The Valley, Stalheim 2002

(Source: cooljomper)

isabelladenyst:

Never getting over this isabelladenyst:

Never getting over this isabelladenyst:

Never getting over this isabelladenyst:

Never getting over this isabelladenyst:

Never getting over this isabelladenyst:

Never getting over this isabelladenyst:

Never getting over this

isabelladenyst:

Never getting over this

(Source: sterjo86)

de-rienn:

Frank Gerwer bombing Lombard Street.
de-rienn:

Frank Gerwer bombing Lombard Street.

de-rienn:

Frank Gerwer bombing Lombard Street.

(Source: sidewalk.mpora.com)

(Source: ghb02)

smoking cigarettes out the bedroom window nd dancing to new order in my underpants w/ some wine like the lost cause that i am

born anxious

"Caucasian, literally, refers to people native to the Caucasus, but it has become interchangeable with any number of ‘White’ populations, most of whom trace their ancestry to Europe. One gets the feeling that the term ‘White’ fell out of favor and was replaced by ‘Caucasian’ much like ‘Black’ was replaced by ‘African-American’. But the roots of such terminology are a bit disturbing; it was postulated that the natives of the Caucasus exhibited the idealized physical appearance so the Caucasus were believed to be the birthplace of mankind. The logic behind this idea — the assumption that Whites exhibit the best physical appearance — is implicitly racist. Additionally, we now know our species first appeared in Africa, so the biology isn’t any good either. The connotations of the term Caucasian along with the geographical absurdity of using that term to describe all Europeans or Whites are the two main reasons we should abandon the term."

vintagenational:

Kodachrome by Volkmar Wentzel.

From “Building a New Austria,” National Geographic, February, 1959.

Hand-painted Easter eggs in Stinatz.


Thobias Faldt
Jens Lekman

Thobias Faldt

Jens Lekman

(Source: sweetadeline112358)

arpeggia:

Louise Bourgeois & Tracey Emin - Do Not Abandon Me, 2009-2010
Do Not Abandon Me is a collaboration between Louise Bourgeois and Tracey Emin consisting of sixteen intimate works made over the past two years. These drawings articulate physical drives and feelings, candidly confronting themes of identity, sexuality and the fear of loss and abandonment through joint expression.
This series originated with Bourgeois, who began the works by painting male and female torsos in profile on paper, mixing red, blue and black gouache pigments with water to create delicate and fluid silhouettes. Bourgeois then passed the images on to Emin, who later confessed: ‘I carried the images around the world with me from Australia to France, but I was too scared to touch them’. Emin overlaid Bourgeois’s forms with fantasy, drawing smaller figures that engaged with the torsos like Lilliputian lovers, enacting the body’s desires and anxieties. In one, a woman kisses an erect phallus; in another, a small fetus-like form protrudes from a swollen belly. In many, Emin’s handwriting inscribes the images with a narrative, putting into words the emotions expressed in Bourgeois’s vibrant gouaches.
This suite of prints was one of the last projects Louise Bourgeois completed before her death. They were then printed at Dye-namix studio in New York with archival dyes on cloth in an edition of 18 sets with 6 artist proofs. The exhibition travels to Hauser & Wirth from Carolina Nitsch Project Room, New York, and is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue.
arpeggia:

Louise Bourgeois & Tracey Emin - Do Not Abandon Me, 2009-2010
Do Not Abandon Me is a collaboration between Louise Bourgeois and Tracey Emin consisting of sixteen intimate works made over the past two years. These drawings articulate physical drives and feelings, candidly confronting themes of identity, sexuality and the fear of loss and abandonment through joint expression.
This series originated with Bourgeois, who began the works by painting male and female torsos in profile on paper, mixing red, blue and black gouache pigments with water to create delicate and fluid silhouettes. Bourgeois then passed the images on to Emin, who later confessed: ‘I carried the images around the world with me from Australia to France, but I was too scared to touch them’. Emin overlaid Bourgeois’s forms with fantasy, drawing smaller figures that engaged with the torsos like Lilliputian lovers, enacting the body’s desires and anxieties. In one, a woman kisses an erect phallus; in another, a small fetus-like form protrudes from a swollen belly. In many, Emin’s handwriting inscribes the images with a narrative, putting into words the emotions expressed in Bourgeois’s vibrant gouaches.
This suite of prints was one of the last projects Louise Bourgeois completed before her death. They were then printed at Dye-namix studio in New York with archival dyes on cloth in an edition of 18 sets with 6 artist proofs. The exhibition travels to Hauser & Wirth from Carolina Nitsch Project Room, New York, and is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue.
arpeggia:

Louise Bourgeois & Tracey Emin - Do Not Abandon Me, 2009-2010
Do Not Abandon Me is a collaboration between Louise Bourgeois and Tracey Emin consisting of sixteen intimate works made over the past two years. These drawings articulate physical drives and feelings, candidly confronting themes of identity, sexuality and the fear of loss and abandonment through joint expression.
This series originated with Bourgeois, who began the works by painting male and female torsos in profile on paper, mixing red, blue and black gouache pigments with water to create delicate and fluid silhouettes. Bourgeois then passed the images on to Emin, who later confessed: ‘I carried the images around the world with me from Australia to France, but I was too scared to touch them’. Emin overlaid Bourgeois’s forms with fantasy, drawing smaller figures that engaged with the torsos like Lilliputian lovers, enacting the body’s desires and anxieties. In one, a woman kisses an erect phallus; in another, a small fetus-like form protrudes from a swollen belly. In many, Emin’s handwriting inscribes the images with a narrative, putting into words the emotions expressed in Bourgeois’s vibrant gouaches.
This suite of prints was one of the last projects Louise Bourgeois completed before her death. They were then printed at Dye-namix studio in New York with archival dyes on cloth in an edition of 18 sets with 6 artist proofs. The exhibition travels to Hauser & Wirth from Carolina Nitsch Project Room, New York, and is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue.
arpeggia:

Louise Bourgeois & Tracey Emin - Do Not Abandon Me, 2009-2010
Do Not Abandon Me is a collaboration between Louise Bourgeois and Tracey Emin consisting of sixteen intimate works made over the past two years. These drawings articulate physical drives and feelings, candidly confronting themes of identity, sexuality and the fear of loss and abandonment through joint expression.
This series originated with Bourgeois, who began the works by painting male and female torsos in profile on paper, mixing red, blue and black gouache pigments with water to create delicate and fluid silhouettes. Bourgeois then passed the images on to Emin, who later confessed: ‘I carried the images around the world with me from Australia to France, but I was too scared to touch them’. Emin overlaid Bourgeois’s forms with fantasy, drawing smaller figures that engaged with the torsos like Lilliputian lovers, enacting the body’s desires and anxieties. In one, a woman kisses an erect phallus; in another, a small fetus-like form protrudes from a swollen belly. In many, Emin’s handwriting inscribes the images with a narrative, putting into words the emotions expressed in Bourgeois’s vibrant gouaches.
This suite of prints was one of the last projects Louise Bourgeois completed before her death. They were then printed at Dye-namix studio in New York with archival dyes on cloth in an edition of 18 sets with 6 artist proofs. The exhibition travels to Hauser & Wirth from Carolina Nitsch Project Room, New York, and is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue.
arpeggia:

Louise Bourgeois & Tracey Emin - Do Not Abandon Me, 2009-2010
Do Not Abandon Me is a collaboration between Louise Bourgeois and Tracey Emin consisting of sixteen intimate works made over the past two years. These drawings articulate physical drives and feelings, candidly confronting themes of identity, sexuality and the fear of loss and abandonment through joint expression.
This series originated with Bourgeois, who began the works by painting male and female torsos in profile on paper, mixing red, blue and black gouache pigments with water to create delicate and fluid silhouettes. Bourgeois then passed the images on to Emin, who later confessed: ‘I carried the images around the world with me from Australia to France, but I was too scared to touch them’. Emin overlaid Bourgeois’s forms with fantasy, drawing smaller figures that engaged with the torsos like Lilliputian lovers, enacting the body’s desires and anxieties. In one, a woman kisses an erect phallus; in another, a small fetus-like form protrudes from a swollen belly. In many, Emin’s handwriting inscribes the images with a narrative, putting into words the emotions expressed in Bourgeois’s vibrant gouaches.
This suite of prints was one of the last projects Louise Bourgeois completed before her death. They were then printed at Dye-namix studio in New York with archival dyes on cloth in an edition of 18 sets with 6 artist proofs. The exhibition travels to Hauser & Wirth from Carolina Nitsch Project Room, New York, and is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue.
arpeggia:

Louise Bourgeois & Tracey Emin - Do Not Abandon Me, 2009-2010
Do Not Abandon Me is a collaboration between Louise Bourgeois and Tracey Emin consisting of sixteen intimate works made over the past two years. These drawings articulate physical drives and feelings, candidly confronting themes of identity, sexuality and the fear of loss and abandonment through joint expression.
This series originated with Bourgeois, who began the works by painting male and female torsos in profile on paper, mixing red, blue and black gouache pigments with water to create delicate and fluid silhouettes. Bourgeois then passed the images on to Emin, who later confessed: ‘I carried the images around the world with me from Australia to France, but I was too scared to touch them’. Emin overlaid Bourgeois’s forms with fantasy, drawing smaller figures that engaged with the torsos like Lilliputian lovers, enacting the body’s desires and anxieties. In one, a woman kisses an erect phallus; in another, a small fetus-like form protrudes from a swollen belly. In many, Emin’s handwriting inscribes the images with a narrative, putting into words the emotions expressed in Bourgeois’s vibrant gouaches.
This suite of prints was one of the last projects Louise Bourgeois completed before her death. They were then printed at Dye-namix studio in New York with archival dyes on cloth in an edition of 18 sets with 6 artist proofs. The exhibition travels to Hauser & Wirth from Carolina Nitsch Project Room, New York, and is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue.

arpeggia:

Louise Bourgeois & Tracey Emin - Do Not Abandon Me, 2009-2010

Do Not Abandon Me is a collaboration between Louise Bourgeois and Tracey Emin consisting of sixteen intimate works made over the past two years. These drawings articulate physical drives and feelings, candidly confronting themes of identity, sexuality and the fear of loss and abandonment through joint expression.

This series originated with Bourgeois, who began the works by painting male and female torsos in profile on paper, mixing red, blue and black gouache pigments with water to create delicate and fluid silhouettes. Bourgeois then passed the images on to Emin, who later confessed: ‘I carried the images around the world with me from Australia to France, but I was too scared to touch them’. Emin overlaid Bourgeois’s forms with fantasy, drawing smaller figures that engaged with the torsos like Lilliputian lovers, enacting the body’s desires and anxieties. In one, a woman kisses an erect phallus; in another, a small fetus-like form protrudes from a swollen belly. In many, Emin’s handwriting inscribes the images with a narrative, putting into words the emotions expressed in Bourgeois’s vibrant gouaches.

This suite of prints was one of the last projects Louise Bourgeois completed before her death. They were then printed at Dye-namix studio in New York with archival dyes on cloth in an edition of 18 sets with 6 artist proofs. The exhibition travels to Hauser & Wirth from Carolina Nitsch Project Room, New York, and is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue.

archaeoillustration:

Venus of Willendorf, artefacts-berlin.de

(Source: artefacts-berlin.de)

artbooksnat:

Original animation layouts from the Hayao Miyazaki film The Wind Rises (風立ちぬ).
artbooksnat:

Original animation layouts from the Hayao Miyazaki film The Wind Rises (風立ちぬ).
artbooksnat:

Original animation layouts from the Hayao Miyazaki film The Wind Rises (風立ちぬ).
artbooksnat:

Original animation layouts from the Hayao Miyazaki film The Wind Rises (風立ちぬ).
artbooksnat:

Original animation layouts from the Hayao Miyazaki film The Wind Rises (風立ちぬ).

artbooksnat:

Original animation layouts from the Hayao Miyazaki film The Wind Rises (風立ちぬ).